One of the things, that the current so-called “world-wide economic crisis” teaches, is this. That this world is a brutal one, where every nation thinks of its own first. Crisis time makes it obvious, while good times conceal it.

For example: the media represents that we in Germany are currently worried about ourselves. And our allies in the EU and overseas, but only because we think that it’s easier to go through crisis together. We care about saving our car industry and the financial sector … .

But a plenty of nations is in much worse a crisis for decades. Nearly all of sub-Saharan Africa, for example. And we simply don’t care any more. Not that we really did before, but now it’s obvious. We let Africa die from AIDS, poverty and corruption, and care to secure our own wealth, blessings they never had. That’s brute. Which does not mean that there’s an obvious better alternative (spreading efforts all over the world is in danger of just going phut). But its brute nonetheless.

4 thoughts on “Yes, we've forsaken the desolate.

  1. Well, I can imagine to one day choose a rural area in Africa, comparable to the way Overland Missions partitions the land into sectors.

    And then, to go there with the expedition vehicle, and do community buildup there for the rest of my life. It would be like choosing a new homeland somewhat …

    But, u know, there’s stuff to be done before that in my life (Second Acts project and stuff).

  2. Jus’ read it … I can imagine these are really hardships, yea. The issue is, I cannot see the intial question “Clerical politics or Paul’s journey?” answered in the article.

    Also, in the narrower sense of the “Xpedition: Second Acts” project, I search for contemporary activity of God. This story, while impressive, contains no event that is obviously supernatural.

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