Lifestyle is equivalent with personal culture, which is one instance of a culture. People with lifestyles that deviate from the surrounding culture of any known group in a large degree can be said to have a “unique culture”: just as unique as the culture of an ethnic group, for example.

Now the problem with having a unique personal culture is interoperability with other people: you will be a foreigner to them though you share their origin. However, if you have been intelligent enough to develop your own culture, you can also develop a social “compatibility mode”, which means talking and behaving with automated translation between their culture and yours. However, you will still not get rid of the impression that this is quite a lonely way of being, except if you find people who developed their own off-center personal culture in a direction that has sufficient overlap with yours, so that you can know each other without compatibility mode …

I know what I’m talking about. My personal culture differs quite widely from that of others in these areas: personal accomodation; my job; nutrition; theology; knowledge management; software environment; personal equipment; language use. And also music, poetry, gaming and movies, if you count my total non-interest in these topics as a cultural attribute of its own.

Leave a reply

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>