Away3D offers the CompositeMaterial class that allows to combine different material layers into one, using different compositing modes. (Note that this applies to Away3D 3.4; in version 2.4, the concept is split so that you have a class BitmapMaterialContainer additionally, which is only for cached materials, that is those that are not changed once applied.)

In my experiments I found that one can get some surreal, crazy materials by combining a texture with a “shade” in strange ways:

var textureMaterial : BitmapFileMaterial = new BitmapFileMaterial(imageUri, {precision: 0, repeat: true, smooth: true, blendMode: BlendMode.NORMAL});

var shadeMaterial1 : PhongColorMaterial = new PhongColorMaterial(0xffffff, {shininess: 5, specular: 0.5, alpha: 1, blendMode: BlendMode.DIFFERENCE});

var shadeMaterial2 : PhongColorMaterial = new PhongColorMaterial(0xffffff, {shininess: 5, specular: 0.5, alpha: 1, blendMode: BlendMode.LIGHTEN});

var crazyMaterial1 : CompositeMaterial = new CompositeMaterial({alpha: 1, color: 0xFFFFFF});

crazyMaterial1.addMaterial(textureMaterial);

crazyMaterial1.addMaterial(shadeMaterial1);

var crazyMaterial1 : CompositeMaterial = new CompositeMaterial({alpha: 1, color: 0xFFFFFF});

crazyMaterial1.addMaterial(textureMaterial);

crazyMaterial1.addMaterial(shadeMaterial2);

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